Diaspora: Gathering Resources

What is Diaspora? It’s a science fiction game, a little less fantastic than Star Trek or Star Wars. Ships still spew reaction mass to travel, it’s a world without transporters and replicators (*probably). The short hand was “Traveler with Fate” — so a modern, less cumbersome system, in a traditional GM & Players role, but without 1970s roleplaying tech.

Basically, it’s useful for a universe somewhat like Firefly with slightly more “realistic” (or just different) ship limitations. In the first session, we’ll generate a cluster of 8-10 or so systems that are close enough for trade and travel. There’s a cool methodology that uses random prompts to encourage us to each create worlds, then link those worlds together with a rough diagram of history, trade connections, etc. Cluster generation is collaborative–we each create the worlds together at the table.

Then we make the characters, who will (probably) become a ship crew that travels between systems. The default idea is that you’ll be independent merchants traveling the black, slipping between systems to turn a profit–but maybe you’ll be explorers, or diplomats trying to defuse the cluster’s crises, or even “archaeologists” exploring the ruins of collapsed cultures. (We might make characters in the same session that we create the cluster–or it might be the second session if we get elaborate with the cluster generation.)

Now that we have the characters and the universe they’ll explore, we’ll launch into play.

Some resources:
Diaspora G+ community
VSCA’s Diaspora page. Which includes the Diaspora SRD, if you’re interested… plus a number of quick references.
Astrobit Diaspora play aids
Diaspora files on BGG
Atomic Rockets, and their common misconceptions page.

Worlds/Campaigns-
2011 Cluster Generation at RPG Meetup
Harmonium Cluster
Labcats play Diaspora
Angels and Omens campaign sessions, campaign setup
A pocket full of star dust

BlueMax Studios, Diaspora

NPCs you’ll meet while traveling
Ship with token
Battlecruiser
Spacehabs mostly cool pictures of space habitats
Random prompt: Aunt Chelsea’s planet
Colors of Blood Earth chemistry discussions
Cool spaceship illustrations
Simple world building from tectonic plates through wind cells and climate zones
Fate SF
Notes on Engineering Goals of Starship Designers

Background info on Stars
Star Gen
Random Star System generator.
Orion’s Arm stellar links page.
Planetary map generators

Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley

You know what’s great? I remix version of a bunch of great essays that you read at the time, but retold and gathered.

It’s a great book, in a convenient format to press on people who don’t spend a lot of time reading online–or those who don’t have the time to read essays.

It was a fast read for me, probably due to the familiarity in part. There are some surprises, and it’s always interesting to see how she approaches media–both those that I’ve also encountered, but also stuff that I’ve only heard about. Similarly, her articles about Requires Hate feel very different now, instead of in the middle of the internet’s shock and horror.

Sadly, her asides about her grandmother growing up in Vichy France are even more pointed; her ability to deal with and dismiss abuse hurled her way seems too like a minimum qualification for being an outspoken woman on the internet these days.

If you’re interested but want a sample before you commit, her Hugo winning essay is here: We Have Always Fought: Challenging the ‘Women, Cattle and Slaves’ Narrative. (her blog)

Dead Out by Jon McGoran

A modern day thriller set in Martha’s Vineyard. It sounds like a book 2–there are lots of asides about the tolls of the events of 6 months ago, which makes me think that’s a better starting place.

Our hero’s a cop, hard driven–forced to take vacation time to deal with his stress, but reluctant to do so. His relationships are tricky and fraught; his opposition escalates to violence early–almost implausibly so. There’s a great undercurrent of suspicion and hidden motives; big money makes its play.

It was a fine book–I’d read more by the author, but I’d be sure to read book 1 next. There was too much void in this book, making it feel incomplete without the even more momentous events in book one.